Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

четверг, 17 сентября 2015 г.

Вино из одуванчиков - день 2


Как я уже рассказывала Вам вчера, до конца месяца я участвую в замечательном читательском марафоне, где более 200 участников читает одну из самых известных книг Рэя Брэдбери "Вино из одуванчиков". Сегодня второй день, и если Вы еще не присоединились, у Вас есть шанс. Вот ссылка на марафон!

Сегодня мы читали первые четыре главы (некоторые онлайн на сервисе Бабелео Букс), а я вот читаю книгу в мягкой обложке (прям как возвращение в машине времени, потому что многие книги уже давно читаю в электронном варианте), это книгу неделю назад я взяла в одной из библиотек Нового Орлеана. С сегодняшнего дня меняется формат заданий, и мы теперь будем писать свои отзывы на английском языке, к чему я сейчас и перейду.




So my general impressions so far are fantastic. I'm loving the book, the characters, the language and the images that the author so graciously showers on us in every paragraph. The book is extremely musical and is packed with metaphors, allegories and sound symbolism. This is good news for most advanced students who love and appreciate literature.

But this news may not be so good for those whose English isn't yet advanced enough to soak in every single metaphor and relish every phrase. Ray Bradbury isn't holding anything back, he's "on the ball," as Americans would say, so it might be challenging to keep up with his language.

Another downside, too, is that nothing is really happening in this part of the book. There're some thoughts of how great life is, how wonderful it is to be alive, there're some precious memories, thoughts, feelings and really palpable experiences, but those may become really drawn-out for the readers who need some action. 

If you're in that group my advice is to find those small parts that you understand and then to relish them. That is what classical reading is all about. It's not just the plot. It's not "who gets whom" or "who loves whom" or, worse yet "who kills whom," it's a process of communicating with the writer, soaking in his language, embracing his memories and "sipping on" his wine.

Here're some examples of such literal "sipping" and my comments:


  1. Dandelion wine. The words were summer on the tongue. The wine was summer caught and stoppered. - What I like about this image is the color of dandelion wine that is associated with summer, and the wine that represents summer itself. The wine that can be stoppered (put in the bottle and corked up) looks like a small portion of summer caught in the bottle.
  2. Hold summer in your hand, pour summer in a glass, a tiny glass of course, the smallest tingling sip for children; change the season in your veins by raising glass to lip and tilting summer in. This is a beautiful metaphor for those of us who enjoy a glass of fine wine at the end of the day. Think of yourself holding a glass in your hand. If the wine in the glass is dandelion wine you're actually holding summer in your hand. Then you can pour it in your glass, then you raise your glass to lip and tilt summer in. This is how you begin drinking, but you're not just drinking wine, you're drinking summer, and you don't simply pour it into your mouth, but tilt it in! beautiful imagery. By the way, one word that you absolutely must know from this phrase is tilt, otherwise you'll miss out on a lot.
  3. ... Fine and golden words... as they would be repeated every winter for all the white winters in time. Saying them over and over on the lips, like a smile, like a sudden patch of sunlight in the dark. Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine. Please take the time and listen to the audio book as well. Perhaps not the entire thing, but just parts of it. The reason is this book is highly musical, and you can hear music almost in every paragraph. Watch how the author uses words and puts them together, arranges them according to the sounds: Dandelion wine (d-l-w-n). Now watch this in the sentence: ... Fine and golden words... as they would be repeated every winter for all the white winters in time. (now read the next one out loud and listen to those sounds, especially d and l). Saying them over and over on the lips, like a smile, like a sudden patch of sunlight in the dark. Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine. Dandelion wine. 
As for the new words. I liked the word "accoutered" (clothed, e.g. the French word Haute couture: the high fashion) as in "the towns [were] accoutered with lawn mower, bug spray and hedge shears..."

I guess this would be it for today. More tomorrow (hopefully :)